Our animals

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Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

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The Pond

The lake

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Danish lake

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Stone reefs

Select species

Select a species to read more


Whiting

Whiting

Egg of small-spotted catshark

Egg of small-spotted catshark

Small-spotted catshark

Small-spotted catshark

Broadnosed pipefish

Broadnosed pipefish

Three-spined stickleback

Three-spined stickleback

Corkwing wrasse

Corkwing wrasse

European flounder

European flounder

European plaice

European plaice

Yarrell's blenny

Yarrell's blenny

Rock gunnel

Rock gunnel

Eelpout

Eelpout

Green crab

Green crab

Common starfish

Common starfish

Edible sea urchin

Edible sea urchin

Dahlia anemone

Dahlia anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Plumose sea anemone

European flounder

European flounder

Facts

LatinPlatichthys flesus
Size60 cm
FoodBottom-dwelling animals and small crustaceans
HabitatSandy and muddy bottom
IUCN

Least concern

LocationEastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean
Map

Rough skin

The flounder has red spots just like the European plaice, but you can recognise the flounder by its rough top side. Along its sides, the flounder has a number of very rough bony ridges. You can easily scrub the skin off of your hands when you clean a flounder.

Eyes on the same side of the head

The flounder looks weird with its eyes on the same side of its head. But it is practical. This way, the fish can lie down burrowed into the bottom and still see what's going on around it. Flatfish usually have eyes on the right or left side of the head. But there are no hard and fast rules when it comes to flounder. The flounder can have eyes on either the right or the left side.

Flounder + European plaice = leps

Although the flounder spawns later than the European plaice, every now and then they reproduce live offspring with one another. This fish is known as the leps. In some places, the leps comprise 10% of the flounder population.

Meet a flounder in the wild

You can see flounder everywhere in inner Danish waters. Frequency increases from the Kattegat towards the Baltic Sea. The flounder thrives in water with low salinity. You can see it several kilometres up in the waterways.


Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Red king crab

American lobster