Our animals

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Tropical rivers and lakes

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Sea snakes

The Ocean

Moray eels

Common octopus

Cuttlefish

Seadragons

The small mouths

The pier

Coral reef

Fish nursery

Under construction

Select species

Select a species to read more


Longnose hawkfish

Longnose hawkfish

Sea goldie

Sea goldie

Clown anemonefish

Clown anemonefish

Yellowtail clownfish

Yellowtail clownfish

Spinecheek anemonefish

Spinecheek anemonefish

Orangeback angelfish

Orangeback angelfish

Square anthias

Square anthias

Bicolor angelfish

Bicolor angelfish

Lemonpeel angelfish

Lemonpeel angelfish

Sea goldie

Sea goldie

Longnose butterflyfish

Longnose butterflyfish

Yellow tang

Yellow tang

Green moray

Green moray

Orangespot surgeonfish

Orangespot surgeonfish

Foxface

Foxface

Goldspotted angelfish

Goldspotted angelfish

Yellowbanded sweetlips

Yellowbanded sweetlips

Spotbreast angelfish

Spotbreast angelfish

Gold-saddle rabbitfish

Gold-saddle rabbitfish

Blackwedged butterflyfish

Blackwedged butterflyfish

Doublesaddle butterflyfish

Doublesaddle butterflyfish

Threadfin butterflyfish

Threadfin butterflyfish

Regal angelfish

Regal angelfish

Mandarinfish

Mandarinfish

Bluegirdled angelfish

Bluegirdled angelfish

Twospined angelfish

Twospined angelfish

Royal gramma

Royal gramma

Red-eye wrasse

Red-eye wrasse

Sixline wrasse

Sixline wrasse

Orangespot surgeonfish

Orangespot surgeonfish

Pastelgreen wrasse

Pastelgreen wrasse

False leopard

False leopard

Elongate surgeonfish

Elongate surgeonfish

Green chromis

Green chromis

Yellowtail tang

Yellowtail tang

Elegant unicornfish

Elegant unicornfish

Palette surgeonfish

Palette surgeonfish

Blue chromis

Blue chromis

Azure damselfish

Azure damselfish

Powderblue surgeonfish

Powderblue surgeonfish

Spotted unicornfish

Spotted unicornfish

Sapphire devil

Sapphire devil

Sapphire devil

Sapphire devil

Blue tang surgeonfish

Blue tang surgeonfish

Blackstriped angelfish

Blackstriped angelfish

Ornate angelfish

Ornate angelfish

Emperor angelfish

Emperor angelfish

Longspined porcupinefish

Longspined porcupinefish

Emperor red snapper

Emperor red snapper

Emperor red snapper

Emperor red snapper

Brownbanded bambooshark

Brownbanded bambooshark

Clown triggerfish

Clown triggerfish

Japan surgeonfish

Japan surgeonfish

Whitecheek surgeon

Whitecheek surgeon

Achilles tang

Achilles tang

Tomini surgeon

Tomini surgeon

Redtail butterflyfish

Redtail butterflyfish

Striated surgeon

Striated surgeon

Southern stingray

Southern stingray

Twotone tang

Twotone tang

Sohal surgeonfish

Sohal surgeonfish

Sleek unicornfish

Sleek unicornfish

Spotted surgeonfish

Spotted surgeonfish

Spotted wrasse

Spotted wrasse

Bangaii cardinalfish

Bangaii cardinalfish

Spotted drum

Spotted drum

Whitetail dascyllus

Whitetail dascyllus

Bluestreak cleaner wrasse

Bluestreak cleaner wrasse

Crab-eye goby

Crab-eye goby

Indian sailfin tang

Indian sailfin tang

Spotbreast angelfish

Spotbreast angelfish

Matted Filefish

Matted Filefish

Blackbar triggerfish

Blackbar triggerfish

Ornate angelfish

Ornate angelfish

Blueband goby

Blueband goby

Bluespine unicornfish

Bluespine unicornfish

Threadfin cardialfish

Threadfin cardialfish

Yellowtail clownfish

Yellowtail clownfish

Facts

LatinAmphiprion clarkii
Size15 cm
FoodSmall crustaceans and algae
HabitatCoral reefs
IUCN

Not evaluated

LocationThe Indian Ocean and Western Pacific
Map

Lives in groups

Clownfish live together in groups in a sea anemone. The group comprises an adult female, an adult male and several young males. The female is the largest and most dominant in the group.

The poisonous sea anemone

The clownfish has evolved to be able to live among the sea anemone’s poisonous tentacles. It is the only fish that can do this. It has a special mucus coating on its body that makes it immune to the sea anemone’s poison.

Symbiosis

Both clownfish and sea anemones benefit from living together. The clownfish hides among the sea anemone’s poisonous tentacles, thereby avoiding being eaten by predators. The sea anemone, on other hand, eats the clownfish’s leftovers. The clownfish also protects it from predators like sea turtles and keeps it clean of parasites.

Changes gender

All clownfish are born as males, but are capable of changing gender. This happens when the female dies. The adult male in the group then becomes female and one of the young males takes his place.

Eggs and larvae

The male builds a nest under a sea anemone and chases the female to the nest. The female lays between 100 and 1,000 orange eggs. When the eggs hatch, the little clownfish larvae drift out to sea with the current. After 12 days, they return to the coral reef as clownfish and find a sea anemone to live in.