Our animals

Select zone

Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

Select aquaria

The Pond

The lake

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Danish lake

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Hideouts of the seabed

Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Red king crab

Select species

Select a species to read more


Wolf-eel

Wolf-eel

Thornback ray

Thornback ray

Canary rockfish

Canary rockfish

Kelp greenling

Kelp greenling

Masked greenling

Masked greenling

Masked greenling

Masked greenling

Padded sculpin

Padded sculpin

Copper rockfish

Copper rockfish

Quillback rockfish

Quillback rockfish

Cabezon

Cabezon

Wolf-eel

Wolf-eel

Facts

LatinAnarrhichthys ocellatus
Size240 cm
FoodBottom-living animals and fish
HabitatLives on the seabed down to 200 m depth
IUCN

Not evaluated

LocationNorth Pacific
Map

Neither a wolf nor an eel

The wolf-eel is in the same family as the catfish and is not related to the eel, although its name implies this.

Is the wolf-eel dangerous?

The wolf-eel's jaws are very powerful. Its teeth enable it to subsist on a hard diet including crabs and sea urchins. The wolf-eel is not aggressive and is more known for its curiosity and friendliness.

A loving start to life

The female lays 10,000 eggs at a time. She then curls herself around the eggs and forms them into a ball the size of a grapefruit. The male then arranges himself around the female to further protect the eggs. For the next 4 months, the female massages the eggs and ensures that fresh water circulates around them. Then the eggs hatch. Wolf-eels mate for life.


American lobster