Our animals

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Scalloped hammerhead

Scalloped hammerhead

Blacktip reef shark

Blacktip reef shark

Whitespotted wedgefish

Whitespotted wedgefish

Ocellated eagle ray

Ocellated eagle ray

Flapnose ray

Flapnose ray

Whitetail stingray

Whitetail stingray

Round ribbontail ray

Round ribbontail ray

Leopard whipray

Leopard whipray

Whitespotted surgeonfish

Whitespotted surgeonfish

Giant grouper

Giant grouper

Atlantic Goliath grouper

Atlantic Goliath grouper

Bowmouth guitarfish

Bowmouth guitarfish

Giant moray

Giant moray

Blackspotted moray

Blackspotted moray

Emperor red snapper

Emperor red snapper

Zebra shark

Zebra shark

Spotted wobbegong

Spotted wobbegong

Brownbanded bambooshark

Brownbanded bambooshark

Longspined porcupinefish

Longspined porcupinefish

Golden trevally

Golden trevally

Sunburst butterflyfish

Sunburst butterflyfish

Eyestripe surgeonfish

Eyestripe surgeonfish

Green moray

Green moray

Common bluestripe snapper

Common bluestripe snapper

Five-lined snapper

Five-lined snapper

Redbelly yellowtail fusilier

Redbelly yellowtail fusilier

Emperor red snapper

Emperor red snapper

Bignose unicornfish

Bignose unicornfish

Humphead wrasse

Humphead wrasse

Yellowbar angelfish

Yellowbar angelfish

King angelfish

King angelfish

Silver moony

Silver moony

Bluespine unicornfish

Bluespine unicornfish

Snubnose pompano

Snubnose pompano

Indo-pacific tarpon

Indo-pacific tarpon

Chinese trumpetfish

Chinese trumpetfish

Bluestreak cleaner wrasse

Bluestreak cleaner wrasse

Dark-banded fusilier

Dark-banded fusilier

Potato grouper

Potato grouper

Whitetail stingray

Whitetail stingray

Facts

LatinUrogymnus granulatus
Size141 cm
FoodSmall fish, crustaceans and bottom-dwelling animals
HabitatMangrove swamps and estuaries
IUCN

Near threatened

The biggest threat is overfishing

LocationEastern part of the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific
Map

Great at hiding

Whitetail stingrays are often found buried in the sand on the ocean floor and only their eyes are visible. They live on crustaceans and clams, which they find in the sand on the ocean floor with their strong, flat teeth.

Poisonous acquaintance

The whitetail stingray has a poisonous barb on its tail. If a predator attacks, the ray lashes out with the barb and stabs the enemy. The poison is situated around the barb and, when the predator is attacked, the poison seeps into the wound.

Ready for life

The whitetail stingray gives birth to live young. While the young are in the female’s stomach, they get nourishment from her yolk sac. When they are born, they are fully functional and can fend for themselves.


Common octopus

Cuttlefish

Seadragons

The small mouths

The pier

Coral reef

Small fish

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