Our animals

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Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

Select aquaria

The Pond

The lake

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Danish lake

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Hideouts of the seabed

Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Select species

Select a species to read more


Atlantic puffin

Atlantic puffin

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Atlantic cod

Atlantic cod

Saithe

Saithe

Pouting

Pouting

Atlantic wolffish

Atlantic wolffish

European eel

European eel

European conger

European conger

European plaice

European plaice

European flounder

European flounder

Turbot

Turbot

Turbot

Turbot

Facts

LatinScophthalmus maximus
Size100 cm
FoodFish, small crustaceans and bottom-dwelling animals.
HabitatSandy and stony bottom
IUCN

Not evaluated

LocationFrom Iceland to Northern Norway and along all European coasts
Map

Get to know the turbot

The turbot has a round, flat body with bony tubercles on its dark side. It is left-eyed. This means that both of its eyes are located on its left-hand side. A European plaice, for example, is right-eyed.

The chameleon of the sea floor

Like other flat fish, the turbot can change colour so that it matches the colour pattern of the sea floor. Using the eye closest to the bottom, the turbot registers the pattern. This is how it hides itself from enemies and lurks in wait for its prey.

Large or small mouth

The size of the turbot's mouth determines the size of prey it can swallow. When the turbot opens its mouth very quickly, it creates a vacuum. The prey is then sucked into the mouth.

Meet a turbot in the wild

The turbot can tolerate low salinity and is therefore also found in the Baltic Sea. It likes deep water – preferably 20 meters or more. You'll have to dive if you want to see a large turbot. The very young fish stay in shallow water near the shore. The turbot is not as common as the European plaice and flounder. But more of them are appearing, perhaps as a result of the higher water temperatures.


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