Our animals

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Moray eels

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Elegant firefish

Elegant firefish

Mandarinfish

Mandarinfish

Copperband butterflyfish

Copperband butterflyfish

Sunburst butterflyfish

Sunburst butterflyfish

Splendid garden eel

Splendid garden eel

Spotted garden eel

Spotted garden eel

Blueband goby

Blueband goby

Razorfish

Razorfish

Jeweled rockskipper blenny

Jeweled rockskipper blenny

Slender seahorse

Slender seahorse

Matted Filefish

Matted Filefish

Longnose hawkfish

Longnose hawkfish

Pacific Cleaner Shrimp

Pacific Cleaner Shrimp

Banded coral shrimp

Banded coral shrimp

Spotted garden eel

Spotted garden eel

Facts

LatinHeteroconger hassi
Size40 cm
FoodZooplankton
HabitatSand bottom
IUCN

Not evaluated

LocationWestern Pacific Ocean
Map

Many together

The spotted garden eel lives in colonies. It burrows its tail deep into the sandy bottom and extends its body and head out of the burrow. At a distance, the colony looks like an area dense with seagrass swaying in the water. Thousands of eels can live in one colony.

Builds burrows

The spotted garden eel digs a burrow into the sandy bottom using its pointy, rigid tail. Using slime from their skin, they cement the walls of their burrows to stabilise them and prevent cave-ins.

Life in a burrow

The spotted garden eel rarely leaves its burrow. When it wants to feed, it extends itself upward and catches the zooplankton that drift by with the underwater current. If it is in danger, the spotted garden eel disappears back into its burrow.

Fights for females

When mating season begins, males and females move their burrows closer together. Once a male picks a female to mate with, he defends her, keeping other males away.


Fish nursery

Under construction