Our animals

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Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

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The Pond

Lakes and rivers

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Danish lake

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Stone reefs and jellyfish

Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Select species

Select a species to read more


Ballan wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Rock gunnel

Rock gunnel

Greater pipefish

Greater pipefish

Broadnosed pipefish

Broadnosed pipefish

Snake pipefish

Snake pipefish

Sea stickleback

Sea stickleback

Three-spined stickleback

Three-spined stickleback

Plumose sea anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Blue mussel

Blue mussel

Snake pipefish

Snake pipefish

Facts

LatinEntelurus aequoreus
Size60 cm
FoodSmall crustaceans
HabitatIn seaweed beds on shallow water
IUCN

Not evaluated

LocationNortheastern Atlantic
Map

Get to know the snake pipefish

The snake pipefish is a pipefish. It doesn't have a caudal fin, an anal fin or pectoral fins. It swims using its long dorsal fin. The snake pipefish is yellow with narrow light-blue stripes and a red stripe near the eye.

Resembles the plants

The snake pipefish lives between the seaweed and aquatic plants, and with its long thin body, it blends in well with its surroundings. It can wind the outer thin section of its tail around a plant, enabling it to stand vertical and sway along with the plants in the current.

Eggs on the belly

In June-July the female snake pipefish attaches 400-1000 eggs to the bellies of several males. The eggs will stay here until they hatch. The small offspring have pectoral fins which later disappear.

Meet a snake pipefish

You have the best chance of seeing a snake pipefish if you go snorkeling or dive near reefs or jetties with good vegetation.


Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Japanese spider crab

American lobster