Our animals

Select zone

Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

Select aquaria

The Pond

The lake

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Danish lake

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Hideouts of the seabed

Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Select species

Select a species to read more


Ballan wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Rock gunnel

Rock gunnel

Greater pipefish

Greater pipefish

Broadnosed pipefish

Broadnosed pipefish

Snake pipefish

Snake pipefish

Sea stickleback

Sea stickleback

Three-spined stickleback

Three-spined stickleback

Plumose sea anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Blue mussel

Blue mussel

Sea stickleback

Sea stickleback

Facts

LatinSpinachia spinachia
Size22 cm
FoodSmall crustaceans and plankton
HabitatSeaweed meadows
IUCN

Least concern

LocationEastern Atlantic
Map

Get to know the sea stickleback

The sea stickleback is long with a thin tail, small mouth and 14-16 spines in front of the dorsal fin. The body is covered by bony plates that make the sea stickleback quite rigid. The sea stickleback is a typical member of the stickleback family.

Multi-coloured

The sea stickleback takes on the colours of its surroundings; for example, if it is brown it lives among brown algae and if it is blue-green, it lives among eel grass. The belly is light in colour.

A brief life

When it is spring the male builds a nest made of seaweed. The female lays her eggs in the nest and dies shortly afterwards. The male guards the nest in the weeks to come. After a couple of weeks, the offspring hatch and the male dies. The sea stickleback only has one brood in its brief life.

Weather fish

The sea stickleback was previously used as a weather fish. The fish was dried and hung on a flax thread in the living area. When humidity rose, the fish became heavier because it absorbed the moisture. When the flax thread stretched longer, it was a warning that rain was soon to come.

Take an excursion

Meet the sea stickleback in both brackish water and salt water. It lives in shallow water in the seaweed belts. It is difficult to see because it camouflages itself.


Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Red king crab

American lobster