Our animals

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Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

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Young sea turtle

The Ocean

Seahorse

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Select a species to read more


Loggerhead sea turtle

Loggerhead sea turtle

Scalloped hammerhead

Scalloped hammerhead

Blacktip reef shark

Blacktip reef shark

Whitespotted wedgefish

Whitespotted wedgefish

Ocellated eagle ray

Ocellated eagle ray

Flapnose ray

Flapnose ray

Round ribbontail ray

Round ribbontail ray

Leopard whipray

Leopard whipray

Giant grouper

Giant grouper

Atlantic Goliath grouper

Atlantic Goliath grouper

Bowmouth guitarfish

Bowmouth guitarfish

Zebra shark

Zebra shark

Spotted wobbegong

Spotted wobbegong

Golden trevally

Golden trevally

Blackside hawkfish

Blackside hawkfish

Sunburst butterflyfish

Sunburst butterflyfish

Threadfin butterflyfish

Threadfin butterflyfish

Eyestripe surgeonfish

Eyestripe surgeonfish

Common bluestripe snapper

Common bluestripe snapper

Five-lined snapper

Five-lined snapper

Redbelly yellowtail fusilier

Redbelly yellowtail fusilier

Yellowbanded sweetlips

Yellowbanded sweetlips

Clown triggerfish

Clown triggerfish

Humphead wrasse

Humphead wrasse

Yellowbar angelfish

Yellowbar angelfish

King angelfish

King angelfish

Bluespine unicornfish

Bluespine unicornfish

Snubnose pompano

Snubnose pompano

Indo-pacific tarpon

Indo-pacific tarpon

Bluestreak cleaner wrasse

Bluestreak cleaner wrasse

Dark-banded fusilier

Dark-banded fusilier

Potato grouper

Potato grouper

Round ribbontail ray

Round ribbontail ray

Facts

LatinTaeniurops meyeni
Size330 cm
FoodBottom dwelling fish, crabs, mussels and snails
HabitatOn the seabed on coral reefs
IUCN

Vulnerable

Vulnerable. The biggest threat is overfishing

LocationThe Red Sea, Indian Ocean and the Pacific
Map

Are they venomous?

Round ribbontail rays have a 20 cm long barb on the middle of the tail. There is venom in the tissue of the barb, but the animal keepers at Den Blå Planet are very comfortable with them, because they are not aggressive.

Stingrays

Not all rays have a barb on their tails, but those that do are called stingrays. The barb is often venomous and is used as a defence against predators, like sharks for example. If the barb breaks off, a new one grows out – just like a nail.

Steve Irwin

The Australian animal expert Steve Irwin died in 2006 from an encounter with a close relative of the black-spotted stingray. Unfortunately, he was stung close to his heart and did not die from the venom, but from loss of blood.

Rays that live on the bottom

Rays like these often live on the bottom where they search for food on or in the soft sand. In order to be able to feed them, the animal keepers have taught the rays to come up to the surface when it is feeding time.


The Shipwreck

Venomous fish

The crevices of the coral reef

The small mouths

Tropical touchpool

Coral reef

Small fish

Under construction