Our animals

Select zone

Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

Select aquaria

The Pond

The lake

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Danish lake

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Stone reefs and jellyfish

Select species

Select a species to read more


Corkwing wrasse

Corkwing wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Goldsinny-wrasse

Goldsinny-wrasse

Three-spined stickleback

Three-spined stickleback

Lumpsucker

Lumpsucker

Tadpole fish

Tadpole fish

Topknot

Topknot

Greater weever

Greater weever

Eelpout

Eelpout

Shorthorn sculpin

Shorthorn sculpin

Green crab

Green crab

Edible crab

Edible crab

Common starfish

Common starfish

Edible sea urchin

Edible sea urchin

Dahlia anemone

Dahlia anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Common whelk

Common whelk

Plumose sea anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Facts

LatinMetridium senile
Size30 cm
FoodPlankton
HabitatOn seaweed, rocks, mussel shells and near jetties
IUCN

Not evaluated

LocationNorthern Atlantic and Pacific
Map

Get to know the plumose anemone

The plumose anemone is tube-shaped and stands on a wide foot that attaches it to the rock or substrate. Around its mouth are many thin tentacles that it uses to paralyse its prey. It is beautiful to look at: whitish, pink and yellow-brown.

Reproduces in two ways

The plumose anemone reproduces in two different ways. It can release eggs and sperm cells in the water. From this comes a small larvae that later attaches itself to the sea bottom as a plumose anemone. The plumose anemone can also fragment a piece of its foot. The small piece developes into a plumose anemone completely identical to its mother.

Meet a plumose anemone

Look down into the water from the jetty when you are in a marina. This is where you'll find the beautiful plumose anemones. If you go snorkelling, you'll see them along the outer jetty and on the reefs.


Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Japanese spider crab

American lobster