Our animals

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Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

Select aquaria

Dwarf mormyrid

Electric eel

Cave tetra

Neon tetra

Arowana

The interesting species of the river

Arapaima

Piranha

Stream aquarium

Select species

Select a species to read more


Arapaima

Arapaima

Barred sorubim

Barred sorubim

Redtail catfish

Redtail catfish

Acary avion

Acary avion

Red-bellied Pacu

Red-bellied Pacu

Itaituba freshwater stingray

Itaituba freshwater stingray

Redhump eartheater

Redhump eartheater

Sailfin pimeloid

Sailfin pimeloid

Broadband red headstander

Broadband red headstander

Metallic livebearer

Metallic livebearer

Rosy tetra

Rosy tetra

Emperor tetra

Emperor tetra

Red phantom tetra

Red phantom tetra

Redhook myleus

Redhook myleus

Colombian darter characin

Colombian darter characin

Striped Headstander

Striped Headstander

Winterbottoms headstander

Winterbottoms headstander

Equator hero cichlid

Equator hero cichlid

Ecuador Cichlid

Ecuador Cichlid

Meta Cichlid

Meta Cichlid

Red-eye Tetra

Red-eye Tetra

Oscar

Oscar

Yellow plankton cichlid

Yellow plankton cichlid

Cardinal tetra

Cardinal tetra

Gulper Catfish

Gulper Catfish

Common Whiptail Catfish

Common Whiptail Catfish

Oscar

Oscar

Facts

LatinAstronotus ocellatus
Size46 cm
FoodFish, crustaceans and worms
HabitatRivers
IUCN

Not evaluated

LocationNorthern South America Our fish are caught in the Itaya River in Peru
Map

Peacock spot on the tail

The oscar has dark stripes on its body, dark dorsal and anal fins and an orange-black peacock spot (eyespot) on its caudal fin. The spot looks like a real eye. When a predator attacks the cichlid, the eyespot confuses the predator because it cannot figure out where the cichlid's head is.

Home is a stone

Cichlids prepare themselves well to become parents. This is particularly true for the oscar and the Rio Grande cichlid: first, the cichlid cleans a stone, rock or tree root. The female then deposits her eggs on the flattened surface, one at a time, and the male swims across the eggs and fertilises them. Both parents fiercely defend the eggs until they hatch.

Protective parents

When the cichlid offspring hatch from their eggs, they are highly vulnerable to being eaten by other fish. For this reason, they stick together in groups and their parents do whatever they can to defend the group. But they have a lot to do: If a young cichlid gets too far away, one of the parents takes it into its mouth and spits it back into the group.

A hump on the head

In some species, the male oscar develops a prominent forehead hump, called the nuchal hump. It is thought that the hump is used to impress female oscars as well as other males.

Where does our fish come from

Our Oscar cichlids came from Peru. They are trapped in the Nanay River.


Under the riverbank

River cichlids

The plants in the river

Angelfish

Armored predators

Discusfish

Veiled chameleon

African river

Archerfish

Endangered species

Lake Tanganyika

Lake Malawi