Our animals

Select zone

Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

Select aquaria

Sea snakes

The Ocean

Common octopus

Select species

Select a species to read more


Scalloped hammerhead

Scalloped hammerhead

Blacktip reef shark

Blacktip reef shark

Whitespotted wedgefish

Whitespotted wedgefish

Ocellated eagle ray

Ocellated eagle ray

Flapnose ray

Flapnose ray

Whitetail stingray

Whitetail stingray

Round ribbontail ray

Round ribbontail ray

Leopard whipray

Leopard whipray

Whitespotted surgeonfish

Whitespotted surgeonfish

Giant grouper

Giant grouper

Atlantic Goliath Grouper

Atlantic Goliath Grouper

Bowmouth guitarfish

Bowmouth guitarfish

Giant moray

Giant moray

Emperor red snapper

Emperor red snapper

Zebra shark

Zebra shark

Spotted wobbegong

Spotted wobbegong

Brownbanded bambooshark

Brownbanded bambooshark

Epaulette shark

Epaulette shark

Longspined porcupinefish

Longspined porcupinefish

Golden trevally

Golden trevally

Blackside hawkfish

Blackside hawkfish

Sunburst butterflyfish

Sunburst butterflyfish

Eyestripe surgeonfish

Eyestripe surgeonfish

Green moray

Green moray

Common blue-strips snapper

Common blue-strips snapper

Redbelly yellowtail fusilier

Redbelly yellowtail fusilier

Raccoon butterflyfish

Raccoon butterflyfish

Emperor red snapper

Emperor red snapper

Orbicular batfish

Orbicular batfish

Bignose unicornfish

Bignose unicornfish

Humphead wrasse

Humphead wrasse

Yellowbar angelfish

Yellowbar angelfish

King angelfish

King angelfish

Bluespine unicornfish

Bluespine unicornfish

Snubnose pompano

Snubnose pompano

Bluestreak cleaner wrasse

Bluestreak cleaner wrasse

Dark-banded fusilier

Dark-banded fusilier

Potato grouper

Potato grouper

Great barracuda

Great barracuda

Indo-pacific tarpon

Indo-pacific tarpon

Ocellated eagle ray

Ocellated eagle ray

Facts

LatinAetobatus ocellatus
Size153 cm
FoodMussels, crabs and octopus
HabitatCoastal waters at the seabed of coral reefs and bays
IUCN

Not evaluated

LocationThe Indo-West Pacific
Map

Cartilaginous fish

The eagle ray’s skeleton is composed of cartilage. The human skeleton is made of bone. Cartilage bones are lighter than real bones, which means the ray does not have to use so much strength to stay afloat in the water.

Mouth full of sand

You can often see the eagle ray swimming along the ocean floor, ingesting mouthfuls of sand. The sand may be filled with food such as clams and snails. The ray sifts out the sand and eats the catch.

A movie star

In the film, Find Nemo the eagle ray plays a major role. The schoolteacher, Mr Ray is actually an ocellated eagle ray who teaches the small creatures about life in the coral reef.


A shipwreck

Cuttlefish

Seadragons

The small mouths

The pier

Coral reef

Fish nursery

Under construction