Our animals

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Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

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The Pond

The lake

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Danish lake

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Hideouts of the seabed

Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Select species

Select a species to read more


Atlantic puffin

Atlantic puffin

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Atlantic cod

Atlantic cod

Saithe

Saithe

Pouting

Pouting

Atlantic wolffish

Atlantic wolffish

European eel

European eel

European conger

European conger

European plaice

European plaice

European flounder

European flounder

Turbot

Turbot

Nursehound

Nursehound

Facts

LatinScyliorhinus stellaris
Size170 cm
FoodFish, octopus and large crusteaceans
HabitatRocky sea floor
IUCN

Near threatened

LocationNortheast Atlantic
Map

Skin like sandpaper

Like all other sharks, the skin of the nursehound is covered with thousands of small dermal denticles. If you stroke it from head to tail, the shark feels totally smooth. But if you stroke in the opposite direction, it is as rough as sandpaper. In the old days they used sharkskin as sandpaper to sand wood, marble and iron.

An armour of teeth

The shark’s skin is covered with dermal denticles and help reduce water resistance when the shark is swimming. They also serve as armour and keep annoying parasites away.

Hunting

With its sense of smell and very special electrical sense, the nursehound can easily track down its prey. It eats crustaceans, cephalopods and even other smaller sharks.

Hides its eggs

Unlike most other fish, nursehounds mate internally. The female lays her egg capsules in seaweed and rocks. The eggs hatch after 7-12 months. At that stage the young are 15 cm long and must fend for themselves.


Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Red king crab

American lobster