Our animals

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Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

Select aquaria

The Pond

Danish forest lake

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Under construction

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Small animals of the stone reef

Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Japanese spider crab

Select species

Select a species to read more


Wolf-eel

Wolf-eel

Thornback ray

Thornback ray

Canary rockfish

Canary rockfish

Kelp greenling

Kelp greenling

Masked greenling

Masked greenling

Masked greenling

Masked greenling

Padded sculpin

Padded sculpin

Copper rockfish

Copper rockfish

Quillback rockfish

Quillback rockfish

Cabezon

Cabezon

Japanese spider crab

Japanese spider crab

Facts

LatinMacrocheira kaempferi
Size400 cm
FoodDead animals, small crustaceans and worms
HabitatSand- and rocky bottom at depths down to 200 meters
IUCN

Not evaluated

LocationWestern Pacific
Map

Adapted to deep-sea conditions

The Japanese spider crab lives at the very bottom of the sea. Down here, food can be hard to come by, so the crab is not picky. It eats anything, from living creatures to carrion, using its long legs to move about in search of its prey.

Record-breaking legs

The Japanese spider crab is the world’s largest crustacean. Measured from leg to leg, it can be up to 4 metres wide. A crab that size weighs 19 kg and has a body as big as a toilet seat!

Creative hideout

To avoid being seen by its enemies, like the octopus, the Japanese spider crab covers its shell with sponges and sea anemones. This helps it to blend in with its surroundings.

An old acquaintance

In addition to its enormous size, this crab can live a very long life. The average age for a Dane is 79 years; Japanese spider crabs are believed to live up to100 years.


American lobster