Our animals

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Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

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The Pond

The lake

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Danish lake

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Hideouts of the seabed

Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Select species

Select a species to read more


Atlantic puffin

Atlantic puffin

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Atlantic cod

Atlantic cod

Saithe

Saithe

Pouting

Pouting

Atlantic wolffish

Atlantic wolffish

European eel

European eel

European conger

European conger

European plaice

European plaice

European flounder

European flounder

Turbot

Turbot

Inca tern

Inca tern

Facts

LatinLarosterna inca
Size35 cm
FoodAnchovies and other small fish
HabitatCoastal cliffs
IUCN

Near threatened

LocationWestern South America
Map

Test bird

The inca tern is originally from South America and therefore does not exactly fit into our Faroese bird cliff. There is a good reason for this. We are using the inca terns as an experiment to see if we can keep free-flying birds in the facility.

The male and female resemble each other

Unlike many other birds, the male and female inca tern are identical. You can recognise them by the dark plumage and funny white feathers that look like moustaches.

Great diver

The inca tern has slender wings and a slender body that enable it to dive down in pursuit of the small fish it eats.

Chooses a partner on the basis of the length of its ‘moustache’

On each side of its head the inca tern has two white feathery tufts. When it needs to find a partner it pursues the bird with the longest tufts. Longer feathery tufts are the sign of a more fertile bird and accordingly a better partner.


Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Red king crab

American lobster