Our animals

Select zone

Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

Select aquaria

Under construction

The Ocean

Seahorse

Select species

Select a species to read more


Olive-brown seasnake

Olive-brown seasnake

Blotcheye soldierfish

Blotcheye soldierfish

Hawaiian squirrelfish

Hawaiian squirrelfish

Blackbelt hogfish

Blackbelt hogfish

Emperor angelfish

Emperor angelfish

Powderblue surgeonfish

Powderblue surgeonfish

Azure damselfish

Azure damselfish

Sunburst butterflyfish

Sunburst butterflyfish

Clown coris

Clown coris

Moorish idol

Moorish idol

Spotted surgeonfish

Spotted surgeonfish

Clown coris

Clown coris

Blue-spotted stingray

Blue-spotted stingray

Greyface moray

Greyface moray

Facts

LatinGymnothorax thyrsoideus
Size66 cm
FoodSquids, fishs and large crustaceans
HabitatCoral reefs
IUCN

Not evaluated

LocationIndo-Pacific
Map

A different sort of fish

The green moray has a body shaped like a snake. Its head is large, its eyes stick out, its mouth is wide, and its teeth are rather sinister looking because they are so large. There are over 200 different species of moray eel. Even though they look different there can be no doubt when you have encountered a green moray.

Seeks food at night

The moray hides in the coral reef during the day. At night, it goes out hunting. With its slender body, the moray can get into crevices where the reef fish hide. The moray has poor vision, but it uses its sense of smell to find its prey.

Two sets of jaws

The moray has two sets of jaws with teeth. It holds the prey with the first set of jaws, and sucks the flesh from the prey with the second set.

Are morays dangerous?

Only 5 out of the 200 moray eel species are poisonous. But the fearsome appearance of the moray has led to a number of myths. The moray doesn't usually attack, unless you put your hand right near its mouth.


The Shipwreck

Venomous fish

The crevices of the coral reef

The small mouths

Tropical touchpool

Coral reef

Small fish

Under construction