Our animals

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Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

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The Pond

The lake

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Danish lake

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Stone reefs and jellyfish

Select species

Select a species to read more


Corkwing wrasse

Corkwing wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Goldsinny-wrasse

Goldsinny-wrasse

Three-spined stickleback

Three-spined stickleback

Lumpsucker

Lumpsucker

Tadpole fish

Tadpole fish

Topknot

Topknot

Greater weever

Greater weever

Eelpout

Eelpout

Shorthorn sculpin

Shorthorn sculpin

Green crab

Green crab

Edible crab

Edible crab

Common starfish

Common starfish

Edible sea urchin

Edible sea urchin

Dahlia anemone

Dahlia anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Common whelk

Common whelk

Goldsinny-wrasse

Goldsinny-wrasse

Facts

LatinCtenolabrus rupestris
Size18 cm
FoodSnails and crustaceans
HabitatBoulder reefs
IUCN

Least concern

Not endangered in the wild

LocationEastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean
Map

Get to know the goldsinny wrasse

The goldsinny wrasse is small with rather large eyes and thick lips. It has a black spot near its dorsal fin and on its tail. The spot at the start of the dorsal fin is often indistinct.

The signals of the spot

The male goldsinny wrasse defends his territory against other males. By raising his dorsal fin and making the black spot visible, he tells the other males to stay away.

Take an excursion

The goldsinny wrasse prefers to be in areas where algae is plentiful. This means that you can see them in shallow water close to 1 meter in depth. During winter, the goldsinny wrasse retreats to deeper water and is therefore more difficult to spot. The goldsinny wrasse is widespread throughout Denmark.


Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Japanese spider crab

American lobster