Our animals

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Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

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The Pond

Danish forest lake

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Under construction

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Small animals of the stone reef

Select species

Select a species to read more


Whiting

Whiting

Egg of small-spotted catshark

Egg of small-spotted catshark

Small-spotted catshark

Small-spotted catshark

Broadnosed pipefish

Broadnosed pipefish

Three-spined stickleback

Three-spined stickleback

Corkwing wrasse

Corkwing wrasse

European flounder

European flounder

European plaice

European plaice

Yarrell's blenny

Yarrell's blenny

Rock gunnel

Rock gunnel

Eelpout

Eelpout

Green crab

Green crab

Common starfish

Common starfish

Edible sea urchin

Edible sea urchin

Dahlia anemone

Dahlia anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Plumose sea anemone

European plaice

European plaice

Facts

LatinPleuronectes platessa
Size100 cm
FoodWorms, bivalves, crustaceans
HabitatSandy bottom. 10-50 meters depth. Young European plaice inhabit shallow waters and move to deeper waters when they become larger
IUCN

Least concern

LocationNortheast Atlantic
Map

Smooth skin with red dots

The European plaice has a smooth brown surface with scattered red spots. The underside is pale and pearly white. Behind its eyes is a row of bony ridges that you can feel if you touch it.

How does a European plaice become flat?

When the larvae hatches from the egg, the European plaice has a normal fish shape. But as it grows to adulthood, it becomes flatter and flatter and one eye moves over toward the other. Finally the eyes are situated right next to each other on the same side of the head.

Right or left eyed

European plaice and sole usually have eyes on the right hand side, while turbot have eyes on the left hand side.

Catch a European plaice

If you want to catch European plaice or other flat fish such as dab or flounder, you will have to go to the coast. You need to use a bottom snood and worm. You can catch flat fish everywhere along the coastline. No one place is better than another, so it's all about finding a good spot.


Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Japanese spider crab

American lobster