Our animals

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Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

Select aquaria

The Pond

The lake

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Danish lake

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Stone reefs

Select species

Select a species to read more


Corkwing wrasse

Corkwing wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Goldsinny-wrasse

Goldsinny-wrasse

Three-spined stickleback

Three-spined stickleback

Lumpsucker

Lumpsucker

Tadpole fish

Tadpole fish

Topknot

Topknot

Greater weever

Greater weever

Eelpout

Eelpout

Shorthorn sculpin

Shorthorn sculpin

Green crab

Green crab

Edible crab

Edible crab

Common starfish

Common starfish

Edible sea urchin

Edible sea urchin

Dahlia anemone

Dahlia anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Common whelk

Common whelk

Edible sea urchin

Edible sea urchin

Facts

LatinEchinus esculentus
Size18 cm
FoodSessile algae, worms and crustaceans
HabitatLives at 10-40 meters depth, particularly seaweed meadows and stony bottoms
IUCN

Near threatened

LocationNortheast Atlantic
Map

Ball-shaped

The common sea urchin is a sea urchin with sharp pink spines. The shell is red or mauve, round like a ball but a bit flattened on the bottom and top. The common sea urchin's mouth is located underneath its body - with the anus and genitals at the top.

Made of calcium carbonate

A sea urchin consists of calcium carbonate, water and a long intestinal canal.

Meet a common sea urchin

If you want to see a common sea urchin, you'll need to dive with an oxygen tank. You will have to reach a depth of 10-40 meters. But you may be lucky enough to find a specimen that has washed up onto the beach.


Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Red king crab

American lobster