Our animals

Select zone

Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

Select aquaria

The Pond

The lake

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Danish lake

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Stone reefs and jellyfish

Select species

Select a species to read more


Corkwing wrasse

Corkwing wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Goldsinny-wrasse

Goldsinny-wrasse

Three-spined stickleback

Three-spined stickleback

Lumpsucker

Lumpsucker

Tadpole fish

Tadpole fish

Topknot

Topknot

Greater weever

Greater weever

Eelpout

Eelpout

Shorthorn sculpin

Shorthorn sculpin

Green crab

Green crab

Edible crab

Edible crab

Common starfish

Common starfish

Edible sea urchin

Edible sea urchin

Dahlia anemone

Dahlia anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Common whelk

Common whelk

Edible crab

Edible crab

Facts

LatinCancer pagurus
Size30 cm
FoodCrustaceans, mussels, snails and dead animals
HabitatSand and stone bottom
IUCN

Not evaluated

LocationEastern Atlantic and Mediterranean
Map

Tastes with its legs

Most people would probably say it is impolite to put your feet in your food, but for the edible crab, it is quite normal. Its legs are covered with tiny hairs which the crab uses for tasting when it finds food on the seabed.

Moulting

The crab has a hard shell that does not grow. Therefore, when the crab grows too big, it crawls out of its shell and forms a new one. While this process is taking place, the crab is soft all over and needs to take extra care to hide until its new shell is fully formed.


Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Japanese spider crab

American lobster