Our animals

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Northern lakes and seas

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Tropical rivers and lakes

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The Pond

The lake

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Danish lake

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Stone reefs and jellyfish

Select species

Select a species to read more


Corkwing wrasse

Corkwing wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Goldsinny-wrasse

Goldsinny-wrasse

Three-spined stickleback

Three-spined stickleback

Lumpsucker

Lumpsucker

Tadpole fish

Tadpole fish

Topknot

Topknot

Greater weever

Greater weever

Eelpout

Eelpout

Shorthorn sculpin

Shorthorn sculpin

Green crab

Green crab

Edible crab

Edible crab

Common starfish

Common starfish

Edible sea urchin

Edible sea urchin

Dahlia anemone

Dahlia anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Common whelk

Common whelk

Corkwing wrasse

Corkwing wrasse

Facts

LatinSymphodus melops
Size28 cm
FoodSmall crustaceans and other animals that live on the sea bottom
HabitatShallow water areas with stony bottoms and in eelgrass
IUCN

Least concern

-

LocationEastern Atlantic Ocean
Map

Get to know the corkwing wrasse

The corkwing wrasse has a black spot in the middle of its caudal fin and one behind the eye. The male is usually green and blue; the female is brown. This is how you can recognise them.

The male entertains the female

In May the male builds his nest made of plant materials. The male lures the female by entertaining her. If the female falls for the male's charms, she lays her eggs in his nest. When the male is finished with the female, he looks for more. The male prefers 4-5 different females to lay eggs in his nest.

Meet a corkwing wrasse in the wild

You can encounter the corkwing wrasse while snorkelling in a harbour by the outer jetty or by reefs close to the coastline.

Sponsor of the corkwing wrasse


Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Japanese spider crab

American lobster