Our animals

Select zone

Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

Select aquaria

Under construction

The Ocean

Seahorse

The Shipwreck

Venomous fish

The crevices of the coral reef

The small mouths

Tropical touchpool

Coral reef

Small fish

Under construction

Select species

Select a species to read more


Damselfish

Damselfish

The Cherry Anthias

The Cherry Anthias

Moroccan white seabream

Moroccan white seabream

Two-banded seabream

Two-banded seabream

Thicklip grey mullet

Thicklip grey mullet

Black sea cucumber

Black sea cucumber

Blackbelt hogfish

Blackbelt hogfish

Dusky grouper

Dusky grouper

Japanese pinecone fish

Japanese pinecone fish

Garpike

Garpike

Coral catshark

Coral catshark

Facts

LatinAtelomycterus marmoratus
Size70 cm
FoodFish, large crustaceans and bottom-dwelling animals
HabitatCoral reefs
IUCN

Near threatened

LocationIndian Ocean and Western Pacific
Map

A small shark

The coral catshark is a small species of shark. The adult grows to a length of 70 cm. In addition to being small, the shark is also slender and flexible which makes it easy for the coral catshark to move around amidst the coral.

Hunts during the night

The coral catshark is active at night which means that is hunts during the night. In daylight, its eyes have a peculiar look and resemble a cat’s eyes, but during the night, the pupils expand so that it can see better and hunt in the dark.

Looks like its surroundings

The cool thing about the colour of the coral catshark is that it can easily hide among the coral and rocks. This makes it difficult for small fish to see it when it hunts, and also for larger sharks that might think of eating it.

Rests on the bottom and among the coral

Some sharks must swim constantly in order to breathe – but not the coral catshark. When it is lying at the bottom or between the coral, it pumps water across its gills through a hole just behind its eyes.