Our animals

Select zone

Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

Select aquaria

The crevices of the coral reef

The Ocean

Seahorse

Common octopus

Cuttlefish

Seadragons

The small mouths

The pier

Coral reef

Select species

Select a species to read more


Mandarinfish

Mandarinfish

Scooter blenny

Scooter blenny

Picturesque dragonet

Picturesque dragonet

Jeweled rockskipper blenny

Jeweled rockskipper blenny

Blueband goby

Blueband goby

Persian blenny

Persian blenny

Fire goby

Fire goby

Copperband butterflyfish

Copperband butterflyfish

Sunburst butterflyfish

Sunburst butterflyfish

Elegant firefish

Elegant firefish

Spotted surgeonfish

Spotted surgeonfish

Matted Filefish

Matted Filefish

Longnose hawkfish

Longnose hawkfish

Royal gramma

Royal gramma

Bluestripe pipefish

Bluestripe pipefish

Razorfish

Razorfish

Splendid garden eel

Splendid garden eel

Spotted garden eel

Spotted garden eel

Pacific Cleaner Shrimp

Pacific Cleaner Shrimp

Banded coral shrimp

Banded coral shrimp

Hingebeak shrimp

Hingebeak shrimp

Bluestripe pipefish

Bluestripe pipefish

Facts

LatinDoryrhamphus excisus excisus
Size7 cm
FoodSmall crustaceans and zooplankton
HabitatCoral and stone reef
IUCN

Least concern

LocationIndo-Pacific and Eastern Pacific
Map

Special relatives

The blue-striped pipefish is related to seahorses. The similarity is very evident when you look at the long, funnel-shaped mouth and the small dorsal fin.

Slow swimmer

Pipefish are not great swimmers. They only use the small dorsal fin for transport, so have a hard time escaping from their enemies. Fortunately they are experts when it comes to hiding in seaweed and are almost invisible in the wild.

The male

Only the male blue-striped pipefish looks after the young. Once the pipefish have mated, the female lays her eggs in the male’s brooding pouch on the stomach and he ‘feeds’ the young when they are ready.


Small fish

Under construction