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Scalloped hammerhead

Scalloped hammerhead

Blacktip reef shark

Blacktip reef shark

Whitespotted wedgefish

Whitespotted wedgefish

Ocellated eagle ray

Ocellated eagle ray

Flapnose ray

Flapnose ray

Whitetail stingray

Whitetail stingray

Round ribbontail ray

Round ribbontail ray

Leopard whipray

Leopard whipray

Whitespotted surgeonfish

Whitespotted surgeonfish

Giant grouper

Giant grouper

Atlantic Goliath Grouper

Atlantic Goliath Grouper

Bowmouth guitarfish

Bowmouth guitarfish

Giant moray

Giant moray

Emperor red snapper

Emperor red snapper

Zebra shark

Zebra shark

Spotted wobbegong

Spotted wobbegong

Brownbanded bambooshark

Brownbanded bambooshark

Epaulette shark

Epaulette shark

Longspined porcupinefish

Longspined porcupinefish

Golden trevally

Golden trevally

Blackside hawkfish

Blackside hawkfish

Sunburst butterflyfish

Sunburst butterflyfish

Eyestripe surgeonfish

Eyestripe surgeonfish

Green moray

Green moray

Common blue-strips snapper

Common blue-strips snapper

Redbelly yellowtail fusilier

Redbelly yellowtail fusilier

Raccoon butterflyfish

Raccoon butterflyfish

Emperor red snapper

Emperor red snapper

Orbicular batfish

Orbicular batfish

Bignose unicornfish

Bignose unicornfish

Humphead wrasse

Humphead wrasse

Yellowbar angelfish

Yellowbar angelfish

King angelfish

King angelfish

Bluespine unicornfish

Bluespine unicornfish

Snubnose pompano

Snubnose pompano

Bluestreak cleaner wrasse

Bluestreak cleaner wrasse

Dark-banded fusilier

Dark-banded fusilier

Potato grouper

Potato grouper

Great barracuda

Great barracuda

Indo-pacific tarpon

Indo-pacific tarpon

Bluestreak cleaner wrasse

Bluestreak cleaner wrasse

Facts

LatinLabroides dimidiatus
Size14 cm
FoodParasites located on other fish
HabitatCoral reefs
IUCN

Least concern

LocationThe Red Sea, Indian Ocean and western Pacific
Map

Cleaning help

The bluestreak cleaner wrasse feeds on parasites that live on the body surfaces, gills and mouths of larger fish such as bass and moray eels. Predatory fish allow the bluestreak cleaner wrasse to work in peace, even though they could easily swallow them whole.

Mutual benefits

In the coral reef, predatory fish actively seek out the bluestreak cleaner wrasse. They want to have parasites removed from their bodies. If a predatory fish has too many parasites, it can become sick. The bluestreak cleaner wrasse benefits by securing a food source.

Why doesn't the bluestreak cleaner wrasse get eaten?

The bluestreak cleaner wrasse has a stunning colouration. It is silver-blue and has a prominent lateral black stripe from its snout to the tip of its tail. This makes it easy to identify. The stripe allows the bigger fish to recognise the bluestreak cleaner wrasse and not eat them.

Changes gender

The bluestreak cleaner wrasse lives in groups with a dominant male and his harem of females. If the male dies, the largest of the females changes gender and becomes a male. The gender change takes place in a few days.


Common octopus

Cuttlefish

Seadragons

The small mouths

The pier

Coral reef

Fish nursery

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