Our animals

Select zone

Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

Select aquaria

The Pond

The lake

The wide creek

Sturgeon

Danish stream

Danish lake

Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Stone reefs

Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Select species

Select a species to read more


Ballan wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Rock gunnel

Rock gunnel

Greater pipefish

Greater pipefish

Broadnosed pipefish

Broadnosed pipefish

Snake pipefish

Snake pipefish

Sea stickleback

Sea stickleback

Three-spined stickleback

Three-spined stickleback

Plumose sea anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Blue mussel

Blue mussel

Blue mussel

Blue mussel

Facts

LatinMytilus edulis
Size20 cm
FoodPlankton
HabitatAlong shores on rocks and other hard surfaces
IUCN

Not evaluated

LocationThe Atlantic and the Mediterranean
Map

Hold on!

Blue mussels live closely together in large lumps. They attach themselves to one another and the surface using strong threads with a kind of glue on the tips.

The blue mussel uses its foot

The blue mussel has a little foot that can stretch out between the two shells. The foot is used for moving round and for cleaning algae from the shells.

Drinking straw

Blue mussels eat plankton, which they catch in the water through a kind of drinking straw. Each mussel can filter an average of 100 litres of water per day!

Proof of pollution

When a blue mussel eats, it ingests both plankton and polluted substances such as heavy metals. That means the blue mussel can be used to prove whether or not water is polluted.


Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Red king crab

American lobster