Our animals

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The Pond

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Sturgeon

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Herrings in the Sound

Boulder reef in the Sound

Hideouts of the seabed

Select species

Select a species to read more


Corkwing wrasse

Corkwing wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Goldsinny-wrasse

Goldsinny-wrasse

Three-spined stickleback

Three-spined stickleback

Lumpsucker

Lumpsucker

Tadpole fish

Tadpole fish

Topknot

Topknot

Greater weever

Greater weever

Eelpout

Eelpout

Shorthorn sculpin

Shorthorn sculpin

Green crab

Green crab

Edible crab

Edible crab

Common starfish

Common starfish

Edible sea urchin

Edible sea urchin

Dahlia anemone

Dahlia anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Plumose sea anemone

Common whelk

Common whelk

Ballan wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Facts

LatinLabrus bergylta
Size70 cm
FoodCrustaceans, snails and mussels
HabitatBoulder reefs and seaweed meadows
IUCN

Least concern

LocationEastern Atlantic
Map

Get to know the Ballan wrasse

The Ballan wrasse and corkwing wrasse look very similar to one another, but you can tell them apart by the fact that the Ballan wrasse does not have the black spot near the caudal fin and behind the eyes, as the corkwing wrasse does.

Changes gender

The Ballan wrasse changes its gender over the course of its life. All young Ballan wrasse are female, but when they are between the ages of 5 and 14, they change their gender and become male.

Meet a Ballan wrasse in nature

Since the Ballan wrasse prefers rocky coasts, it is not usually found in Denmark, but rather in Sweden and Norway. But you may be fortunate enough to encounter this beautiful fish on a snorkelling trip in the reefs along the east coast of Jutland, or along Zealand's north coast.


Sandy bottom

Eelgrass in the Sound

Faroese bird cliff

Seaotter

Pacific octopus

Red king crab

American lobster