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Atlantic puffin

Atlantic puffin

Cuckoo wrasse

Cuckoo wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Ballan wrasse

Atlantic cod

Atlantic cod

Saithe

Saithe

Pouting

Pouting

Atlantic wolffish

Atlantic wolffish

European eel

European eel

European conger

European conger

European plaice

European plaice

European flounder

European flounder

Turbot

Turbot

Atlantic puffin

Atlantic puffin

Facts

LatinFratercula arctica
Size30 cm
FoodFish and large crustaceans
HabitatResides on the rocky cliffs. Winter is spent at sea
IUCN

Vulnerable

The Atlantic puffin is threatened by rising sea temperatures and a lack of food due to overfishing of its prey.

LocationNorthern Atlantic
Map

The Atlantic puffin

The Atlantic puffin spends most of its time far out to sea. This is where it catches its food. The Atlantic puffin only returns to land when it is breeding time.

Beak as signal flag

The Atlantic puffin has a very distinctive beak. During breeding time, the beak takes on very beautiful colours and is used as a signal flag. When breeding time is over, the beak loses its colour.

Life begins in a tunnel

The nest is a long tunnel that the male excavates high up on the grassy cliff tops. The female lays one egg. The couple takes turns incubating the egg. When the chick hatches, the parents take turns feeding it with small fish. After 40 days the fledgling chick departs from the nest and is on its own.

Penguins of Scandinavia

The Atlantic puffin dives for fish and uses its wings to swim. They appear to almost fly under the water. They resemble the penguins of the Southern Hemisphere. Unlike penguins, the Atlantic puffin also flies through the air.

Sponsor of the atlantic puffin


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