Our animals

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Northern lakes and seas

The ocean

Tropical rivers and lakes

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Dwarf mormyrid

Electric eel

Cave tetra

Neon tetra

Arowana

Philippines crocodile

Arapaima

Piranha

Stream aquarium

Under the riverbank

River cichlids

The plants in the river

Angelfish

Armored predators

Discusfish

Select species

Select a species to read more


Apalachicola snapping turtle

Apalachicola snapping turtle

Alligator gar

Alligator gar

Denison barb

Denison barb

Silver flying fox

Silver flying fox

Rainbow shiner

Rainbow shiner

Dwarf Chain Loach

Dwarf Chain Loach

Spotted green hillstream loach

Spotted green hillstream loach

Bluefin killifish

Bluefin killifish

Common Bristlenose Catfish

Common Bristlenose Catfish

Alligator snapping turtle

Alligator snapping turtle

Facts

LatinMacrochelys temminckii
Size80 cm
FoodFish, crustaceans and plants
HabitatRivers, lakes and swamps
IUCN

Vulnerable

Vulnerable as agriculture has altered its habitat. Moreover it is caught for its meat.

LocationThe Apalachicola River in Florida
Map

Hard to see

With its jagged shell and grey-brown colours, the alligator snapping turtle blends in with its surroundings on the riverbed. It hides among tree roots and rocks, waiting for its prey.

Sticks out its tongue

When the alligator snapping turtle hunts, it lies completely still with its mouth open. The only thing that moves is its tongue, which looks like a worm. When a fish is lured into its gaping mouth by the worm-like appendage, the mouth snaps shut.

Holds its breath

The alligator snapping turtle lies in wait for its prey and moves very little. Because it lies still, the turtle uses very little oxygen and therefore only needs to go up for air every 50 minutes.

A giant

The alligator snapping turtle is the largest of the freshwater turtles. Some male turtles weigh up to 113kg. The smaller females weigh around 23kg.


Poison Frog

African river

Archerfish

Endangered species

Lake Tanganyika

Lake Malawi